Plastic Obsession


Today’s Writing Club exercise consisted of a number of short bits to warm up, followed by a piece based on one of them.

1st:
An opening line based on time.

Once upon a time, time weighed heavily upon the once-timely clockmaker.

2nd:
A confession.

If I told you that I used to be a big shot who got whatever he wanted by stabbing people in the back, would you believe me?

3rd:
Two word confessions, as many as you can think of in a minute.

I eat. He’s dead. I smash. We loiter. I want.

4th:
Begin five seconds into the action.

“Tell me now, or I’ll let go.” / “The poison tasted like Turkish delight, going down smoothly.”

5th:
Introduce a character in a specific setting.

Charles – called Chuck by his crew even though he hated it – leaned back in his director’s chair, fixed his eye on the leading lady, and shouted, “Action!”

6th:
Reveal a character’s obsession.

“That’s 65,875 pieces!” shouted Charlie, wobbling at the top of the ladder as he snapped the final stud atop his Lego Christmas tree.

Finally:
WRITE A STORY BASED ON ONE OF THE LINES.


“That’s 65,875 pieces!” shouted Charlie, wobbling at the top of the ladder as he snapped the final stud atop his Lego Christmas tree.

“Great,” Wanda breathed in a weary monotone. “Just what we need around here.” She looked just past the so-called tree at an array of crooked shelves where the Lego Star Wars collection resided, and to the left where more shelves housed a Lego recreation of Middle Earth populated by minifigure orcs, and to the right where a Lego City founded upon wallpapering tables rose with skyscrapers and El-trains toward the Lego planes and helicopters suspended by threads from the ceiling.

Presents were already under the tree, each one a box filled withe distinctive sound of plastic bricks.

But behind her was the area that bothered her most, a wall entirely dedicated to Lego Friends and Disney Princess kits. These extremely girly creations from the Danish masters of plastic were, he said, for their young daughter, who was – let’s see – in college now.

“I have had enough. You can’t keep squandering our family finances on your plastic obsession. You had better choose – them or me. Come on, what’s it going to be?”

He stopped halfway down the ladder, eyes darkened, face fallen. “Actually,” he said hesitantly, “it’s 65,876 pieces.”

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